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21 VINTAGE PLANS BUILD KIDS CAR BIKE SCOOTER GO CART TRAIN


Great collection of 21 kids vintage plans all on 1 CD.
Detailed below is all thats covered in this CD

Click here for a few pics

Mini Bike Scooter Project Plans How To Guide VINTAGE

Only at this price for the next 10 Days


PLAN 1

Build this mini-bike in your spare time in the garage. This little bike uses a large ATV-type tire in the rear, and therefore is suitable for off-road driving. Imagine getting around the woods quickly on the back of this scooter.

Using a small 2.5 hp engine, this project could drive around for hours on one tank of gas. It's a great hunting or scouting vehicle.

Most commonly, though, the mini-bike is fun for kids to tool around on! Check out these easy to build free mini bike plans.

For transportation across the wilds, you can't beat this mini bike. Its tiller engine sends it over rough terrain at speeds up to 10 m.p.h.gets you to remote hunting and fishing sites ahead of your footsore companions.

An extendable rear rack takes your equipment load off your back, and carts clumsy-to-carry game back to the campsite. When this pack rack isn't needed, you just slip out the extension pipes, or just leave them in place, capping the frame-pipe ends with crutch tips to keep the extensions from working out.

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PLAN 2

These plans advertise that the pocket bike is small enoghh to fit in a school locker. That seems extreme, but the point is not lost on us these things are tiny!

The plans call for a 3/4 hp engine, and say that it should go about 11 MPH, not bad for such a small package. At two feet in length, that speed is sure to feel like a lot faster. When you get to where you're going on this little racy bike, parking is no problem at all. A short piece of chain will lock up your wheels to just about anything.

Small machines are a great way to get your kids interested in tools and machinery. Give them a small engine repair book and put them in charge of repairs; soon they will learn the ins and outs of small motors.

But we're getting ahead of ourselves. First create that scooter with these easy to build free plans!

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PLAN 3

This scooter is a larger version of the gas powered scooter. The photo shows it skinned with sheet metal. This larger version would be better suited for distance driving on the street than the other on, as it is larger and more powerful.

This scooter can take a much larger motor than the plans suggest. The plans suggest that for flat ground putting, a 1.5 hp motor is adequate. We'd suggest something much larger if you're interested in speed, or if you live in an area that has any amount of hills. You'd feel pretty funny if your scooter slowed to a snail's pace when climbing hills.

The frame is completely angle iron, so it's very easy to build. The scooter plans also call for spring shocks to cushion the ride.

All in all, this scooter would be a great project for adults to cruise to neighbor's houses and down to the corner store.

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PLAN 4

All children muse to themselves (or anyone that will listen) that it would be *so cool* if bikes had motors on them. Now they can!

These motorized bike plans call for a 1 hp air-cooled engine for the powerplant. They say that the bike will top out at 35 MPH.

Though it may now be possible, we can't vouch for this acutally being a good idea. Actually, it seems crazy, considering all the custom work you'll need to do to the bicycle. You'd probably be better off building a scooter from scratch.

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PLAN 5

These are plans for a vintage style mini bikes with a torque convertor. There are two plans - the first uses a junked bicycle for parts, and the second is the super old-school traditional mini bike style.
Take a small kart engine, add a slick variable-ratio belt transmission and you'll have a real performance 'bear' for half the cost of a commercial motor scooter.

On flat ground this scrappy little mini bike can hit around 30 mph. And when you come to a hill, the torque convertor will automatically downshift to a lower drive ratio to give you rugged hill-climbing power.

The best part is the machine's lightweight, low-cost design. The basic frame comes from a discarded 26-in. boy's bicycle, which you can usually pick up for a few dollars at a bike shop or junk yard. Most of the parts are stock bike or kart items, easy to come by and easy to assemble. Even if you start with a new engine, the entire scooter can be built on the cheap.

A simple mini bike is a great way to get you and your kids working together. You'll both learn a vast amount about small engines. It's a great way to encourage mechanical ability in your children. And if you give them a budget for custom work, watch thier imaginations fly dreaming up cool accessories and doodads.

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PLAN 6

Take a small kart engine, add a slick variable-ratio belt transmission and you'll have a real performance 'bear' for half the cost of a commercial motor scooter.

On flat ground this scrappy little mini bike can hit around 30 mph. And when you come to a hill, the torque convertor will automatically downshift to a lower drive ratio to give you rugged hill-climbing power.

The best part is the machine's lightweight, low-cost design. The basic frame comes from a discarded 26-in. boy's bicycle, which you can usually pick up for a few dollars at a bike shop or junk yard. Most of the parts are stock bike or kart items, easy to come by and easy to assemble. Even if you start with a new engine, the entire scooter can be built on the cheap.

A simple mini bike is a great way to get you and your kids working together. You'll both learn a vast amount about small engines. It's a great way to encourage mechanical ability in your children. And if you give them a budget for custom work, watch thier imaginations fly dreaming up cool accessories and doodads.

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PLAN 7

These are plans for a vintage style mini motorcycle.

This little motorcycle has been designed to operate on wartime rations! Its construction is simple and light, but it is surprisingly practical and will carry a 250-lb. passenger without complaining. A 5/8-h.p. engine whips it along at a 25-m.p.h. clip and as for gas consumptionone gallon for every 120 miles, and we doubt if there's another motorcycle that can do better than that.

The Mite Cycle shown here was built by the author at a total cost of $50. It weighs 85 lbs. and is powered by a Briggs and Stratton engine. All unnecessary frills were forgotten in its construction, and the only tools used were a small lathe, a hack saw and a welding torch. The frame, being the foundation of the project, should be built first.

It is made of salvaged aircraft streamline tubing. 2-1/2"x.035 wall, procurable from any airport where small planes are repaired. These dimensions need not be adhered to exactly as a slightly larger or smaller tubing, or even a plain round tubing of 1-1/8"x.035 wall, is satisfactory. After procuring the tubing make a full-size drawing of the frame on the shop floor and cut the pieces to the angles and lengths given, fitting them to the drawing as you go. After this is completed, build the two lower frame pieces.

The base tube (11-1/2") is spotted to the forward tube going up to the fork neck and also to the rear tube going to the rear wheel hangers. Three spreaders are required and these are cut 4" long from 1" o.d. .035 wall tubing; two of these are located bet-ween the lower frame sides and spotted into position as noted. The forward tubes are cut on the insides and bent together to form the V as shown in the bottom view, then welded. The upper rear tubes then are laid together and the third spreader is located 9-3/4" c.c. to the rear of the taper terminating pont and welded into position.

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PLAN 8

These are two different plans for gas powered scooters you can build.
Build this gas powered scooter in your garage, and then take it for a spin! Check your local laws, based on equipment you may be able to drive your scooter on the street legally.

This scooter is a simple, sit down style. It's a lot of fun for keeping up with go karts, tooling around the neightborhood, and exploring. Though not intended for off road use, one could probably go trail riding because of the sturdy design.

Using a small 2.5 hp engine, this project could drive around for hours on one tank of gas.
Scooters are a great way to get your kids interested in motors and machinery. Just put them in charge of repairs, and they'll soon learn the ins and outs of small motors. Then give them a budget for custom work and watch them dream up cool accessories for the scooter.

But first, use our easy to build free plans and create that scooter!

 

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VINTAGE BOAT BUILDING HOW TO GUIDE PLANS INBOARD OUTBOARD

A collection of 8 vintage books all about boat building


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PLAN 1

These plans are for a large cabin cruiser boat, measuring 25 feet.

Although this section describes the building of a sedan cruiser, this particular hull, with a few changes in the cabin construction, is readily adaptable to a sport fisher, express cruiser or utility boat.
boatIdeal for use on large lakes or rivers, and fully seaworthy for offshore ocean cruising, the "Sea Craft" is a smart cabin cruiser designed with an eye toward simple, low-cost construction for the inexperienced boatbuilder.

During World War II, the original boat was given severe tests for seaworthiness when it was used by the United States Coast Guard to take highranking officers from ship to shore.

The boat has an over-all length of 24 ft, 7 in., and a breadth at sheer of 7 ft. 8 in. A converted Chrysler "75" auto engine easily pushed it along at a cruising speed of 15 knots. However, any marine or converted auto engine of similar horsepower may be used.

The cabin design of Sea Craft was selected because it offers one of the best all-around accommodations. Its open cockpit is large enough for fishing, lounging or sun bathing and the roomy cabin provides comfortable living quarters on a long cruise. It is equipped with a fresh-water tank, sink, cooking stove, toilet and two bunks.

Two additional upper bunks can be fitted to sleep a total of four. In addition, there is plenty of cabinet and stowage space for gear.

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PLAN 2

These plans are for a cart to haul your outboard motor around after removing it.

This outboard motor cart has everything.

It's strong enough to handle a 40-horsepower engine; it's rigid enough to allow it to be used as a repair stand, even to cranking; it hauls a gas tank, with room left for a tool box; it's so well balanced that a child or a woman can move a big engine easily; and it folds compactly in 10 seconds by removing one pin which also locks it in the folded position.

What's more it's light, easy to build and cheap.

If the materials are salvaged from scrapped toys and discarded pieces of pipe, it can be built for peanuts. Even if used materials are purchased and spot welding is paid for, the cost shouldn't be too high. A cart incorporating all its features would sell for a good deal more.

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PLAN 3

These plans are to build a flat bottom fishing jon boat.

Fisherman who like to work the shallow backwaters and weed patches on lakes and rivers will find this flat-bottom scow-type boat an ideal craft.

Although the boat is only 12 ft. long, its wide, flat bottom provides more usable space than most round or V-bottom boats of similar size. Low-cost, readily available materials are used throughout.

Frames, gunwales, deck beams, chine logs, seat stringers and seat back are made of pine lumber. The runners and chine moldings are solid oak. AB-grade exterior plywood is used for the deck, bottom and side planking and transom 3/8-in. stock for the former and 3/4-in. stock for the latter.

Fishing from this jon boat will be more rewarding since you built it yourself!

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PLAN 4

These plans are for a 17 ft wooden skiff.

The Happy Clam is the latest of over 65 boats having this unusual hull form that have come from the boards of the Atkin family during the past 25 years. They have varied in size from the 17-footer shown here to a 305-foot shallow-draft tanker developed during the past war.

Each has proven seaworthy and successful in attaining high speed with low power. Among the inherent advantages of this hull form are its shallow draft, great stability, and low center of gravity. Full protection for the propeller is provided by the box keel. Flow of unbroken water to the propeller is made possible by tapering the keel to the propeller post.

The relatively wide, flat keel maintains the boat in a level position when beached or trailerborne. The nearly level shaft angle, which is of value in performance, is not possible to achieve in any other hull form.

The principal dimensions of this little hooker are 17 feet over all, 16 feet on her designed water line, 5 feet 6 inches wide, and 11½ inches draft. Her ample freeboard of 28½ inches forward and 19 5/8 inches at her stern assist in making her a dry boat.

Her speed came up to full expectations. She was accurately clocked over the official measured mile off Lloyd's Neck in Long Island Sound, making 14.8 mph with a Palmer 5-hp. Baby Husky marine engine turning 2,250 rpm. The Columbian Type E two-bladed propeller is 10 in. in diameter and has a 6-in. pitch.

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PLAN 5

These plans are for a small 12 foot wooden boat to be fitted with an outboard motor. The boat is a v-hull design, which will handle waves better than a flat bottom.

Got a little fellow who yearns to captain his own craft? Take a cue from this pint sized inboard. The Little Fellow is only 78 inches long, has a beam of 36 inches and weighs about 125 pounds. The original design had a 7.5 HP engine which pushed it at 30 MPH.

However, a 5-hp outboard would be ample, giving a speed of 25 mph. Since the load is light, this engine will turn up to its peak of 4200 rpm, but it is wise to adjust the throttle so that continuous operating revolutions will be somewhat less. As shown in the drawing, the engine is stationary.

A rudder is used for steering. Parts of the rudder assembly can be fabricated or the whole assembly can be bought from marine supply houses. This would include the shaft, tiller arm, collar and port with stuffing box.

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PLAN 6

These plans are for a small 12 foot wooden boat to be fitted with an outboard motor. The boat is a v-hull design, which will handle waves better than a flat bottom.

From the article:

If you want a lightweight utility boat with a nice turn of speed and easy handling, build the "Banta". A boat like this has a lot to recommend it -- simple, inexpensive construction, a one-man weight of less than 150 pounds, practically leakproof -- she's a smooth, easy sailor on any man's river. Good enough for rough water, too. The v-bottom of the "Banta" makes her a much better rough-water boat that conventional flat-bottom plywood construction. She'll ride 'em!

Banta is built upside down on a level surface, the most convenient method of working being to make a building platform, as shown in the drawing.

Planking for Banta is 1/4-in. fir plywood of the waterproof, resin-bonded type. Two standard 4 by 12-ft. sheets are required. One sheet will make the two side planks, while the other sheet will cut the two bottom planks and the deck. The side planks are applied first. Fitting is quite simple since the half sheet of plywood can be bent to the frames and held with clamps while the shape is being marked with a pencil. The planks are cut off square at the stem and will provide a flat of about 3/4 in. on which to land the outer stem piece. The bottom planks butt together at the keel and extend over the side planks. All fitting should be done dry, after which the permanent assembly can be made with cold resin glue.

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PLAN 7

These plans are called the "Anyone's Boat", because as they claim, anyone can build it.

You can power it with oars or outboard. Neither time nor cost should stop you. About $12 and 16 hours will complete the job.

For it's true that anyone can build this boat. If you are just plain anyone, beg a few dollars (about 12), borrow some tools (a hammer, chisel, plane, saw and a heavy drift), buy your materials and steal some
time (around 16 hours if you don't waste any of it). You'll wind up with a strong boat that will perform well with any outboard from 1.5 to 22 horsepower and will even respond to rowing.

The lack of a framework is the secret of the simple construction. The sides fair naturally around the single mold stick inserted between the stem and the stern. You can bang the job together with about four pounds of eight-penny nailsuse galvanized.

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PLAN 8

These plans are called the "Aquarail", and are for a jet ski type boat using an outboard motor.

The most attractive feature of the Aquarail is that she's a fast, highly maneuverable yet safe boat. With a
high-pitch, two-blade prop on our 20-hp Chrysler outboard she does more than 35 mph carrying one person and more than 30 carrying two. With a lower prop pitch she would pull a water skier at close to 30 mph.

Unlike buying a Jet Ski and having a boat also, having a small watercraft like this means that you could use your outboard on both a jon boat and this jet ski.

But this Aquarail is not a jet ski short on functionality. There's plenty of room under the padded seat to tote such picnic comestibles as sandwiches and beer. And towels, bathing suits or tackle boxes easily fit along the foot well. Total cost for Aquarailincluding the fiberglass bottomran under $100 when these were published. Hull weight finishes out at roughly 140 lbs.

But Aquarail has yet another attractive feature. Practically any motor up to around 35 hp will fit on her. Even the small motors give her a nice zip.

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BUILD 6 WHEEL ATV PLANS GUIDE HOW TO VINTAGE

These plans are for a six wheel drive go kart ATV vehicle.

The drive is on the outside of the vehicle, therefore the chain drive is fully away from the passenger compartment.

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BUILD GO CART KART PLANS GUIDE VINTAGE

A go kart is one of the greatest joys of a young boy's life. Speed, power, freedom of the open road!

Build a go kart with these easy to use plans. Many of the parts you'll need can be fabricated. Other parts like go kart wheels and brakes can be found from an online supplier.

This project is set up for a one-seater go kart, but it can just as easily be customized to a two-seater configuration. We suggest a two seats, since your kids will probably try to carry a friend with them if there's a seat or not.

We like that these vintage go kart plans really haven't needed to change much. Modern karts have roll bars, and that's a very good addition to a go kart design, but otherwise "keeping it simple" is the rule of thumb on these machines.

Go carts generally use a 5 HP tiller motor. This is not a lawn mower engine; it must be a horizontal shaft motor, not a vertical shaft like most lawn mowers are. A lawn mower engine's oil and gas delivery systems are not set up for changing the orientation. However, if you can design a conversion, let us know and we'd love to add it to our projects.

Live axles are used on some carts, but we suggest from experience that you do not use a live axle. It's just as easy to run the sprocket to the drive wheel and not have to deal with a live axle. Additionally, if both wheels turn at the same rate, then there are turning difficulties.

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HOW TO BUILD 3 WHEELED ATV VINTAGE PLANS

A road go kart is a lot of fun, but this project takes the fun off-road.

We have two different plans, but both are essentially the same. They're both linked at the bottom.

A simple design, the ATV uses a tiller-type steering system instead of a wheel. The gas is controlled by a hand operated throttle. The tires are the secret to it's off-road go kart ability they measure 12 inches across and 16 inches in diameter.

The three wheeled go kart is great for sand, dirt, mud, rocks, etc. Because of the three wheeled design, the cart will find "level" on any surface, meaning that it will keep all three wheels on the ground at all time for maximum traction. That is, unless you take it off some sweet jumps.

Pull on the lever for brakes, and twist the motorcyle-like throttle to give it the gas. They suggest a 4-7 HP motor for the project.

For this back-country driving machine, a live axle is a must. And since turns will be made on a soft surface, it is not a problem that both wheels turn at the same rate, since they can slip as needed.

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Miniature train in your garden PLANS GUIDES HOW TO VINTAGE

These plans are to show you how to build a miniature train and train track in the backyard.

Build the kids this backyard mini train and you'll share in the fun! Backyard railroading is a man-sized hobby for all the family. Once you handle the throttle of a midget engine and feel the thrust of drivers on rails, ordinary Lionel railroading becomes a spectator sport.

A passenger-carrying pike costs less than you may think. It can give you scope for as much or as little time and skill as you care to invest. Like its tinplate cousins, it can grow up along with the children from year to year.

You don't need a big lot. One type of track can be laid in a circle as small as 12' across. Interesting layouts can be put on a city lot.

Here's what it takes: A reasonably levcl space, preferably at least 30' by 40'. As much cash as a modest electric line would cost. Ordinary garden and hand tools. One or more children so that you can claim that you're doing it for them.

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Build a 1901 Model Car child kids VINTAGE PROJECTS

Recapture the romance of the horseless carriage era! Be the man who owns one!

We have two different plans, one for a 1901 Packard, and one for a 1901 truck. They're both linked at the bottom.

It has been 63 years since the great-granddaddy of this bright-red 1901 Packard roadster purred its way down America's roadways. Our half-size version should bring a twinge of nostalgia to MI's senior readers and delight the younger set.

Under the tonneau (that's the rear-deck lid, son) there's a modern two-hp gasoline engine with chain drive direct to the axle. Speeds up to 15 mph are possible. Designed to carry two youngsters in comfort, the car also is sturdy enough to haul two adults. Righthand steering (as in the early days), an automatic centrifugal clutch, a foot brake and hand accelerator at your fingertips make operation of the vehicle a breeze.

It was on Aug. 13, 1898, that James Ward Packard purchased the 12th car built by Alexander Winton. On his trip home to Warren, Ohio, some 50 miles from the Winton factory in Cleveland, the car broke down. The incensed purchaser returned to the factory to complain about his lemon and Alexander Winton told him, "If you're so smart, Mr. Packard, why don't you build acar yourself?" History has recorded the results. The first Packard was sold in January 1900.

Almost immediately the reputation of Packard was secure. "Ask the man who owns one" became a household phrase. We hope the building of this replica 1901 Packard roadster will recapture for you some of the romance and excitement of the horseless-carriage era.

The body is made of plywood, the frame of angle iron, with a minimum of welding. You can purchase such hardto- make parts as wheels (aluminum cast16x1.75 with semi-pneumatic tires) and hub caps, steering wheel, pillow blocks (one-inch Fafnir), ball joints and brake (Mercury strap). The other parts, for the running gear, require but a small amount of machining. Most of the construction can be accomplished in the home workshop.

Just a small sample of whats on the CD