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STARRING ROBBIE COLTRANE, SUSAN TYRELL, COOKIE MUELLER, JOHN
LURIE, LYDIA LUNCH, LANCE LOUD, & BILL RICE. Despite its
creative casting, this underground feature from writer-director
Amos Poe (the '76 CBGB doc THE BLANK GENERATION, ALPHABET CITY) had
limited success when first released -- premiering at Carnegie Hall
Cinema and briefly playing midnight shows at the long-defunct
Bleecker Street Cinema -- before disappearing into the void. Amos
Poe tackles the lead role of Anthony (after John Lurie pulled out,
a day before production started), a creepy, wimpy
writer/saxophonist, who's currently working on a screenplay about a
street musician who guns down pedestrians. But corpses also begin
to turn up on the streets of NYC, mirroring Anthony's script, and
in one of his earliest screen roles, future-Cracker Robbie Coltrane
plays hard-boiled cop Fritz Langley, who's on the case and
frustrated with both his job and home life. It's no small wonder,
what with Susan Tyrell (looking as dyke-ish as possible with
greased-back short hair and Divine-esque eyebrows) playing his
smack-addict wife Eleanor, and it's fun to watch these two
bickering and taking cheap shots at each other. In subplots,
Anthony meets various people and incorporates versions of them into
his disjointed screenplay, including sexy neighbor Penelope (John
Waters-vet Cookie Mueller), who's being driven nuts by Anthony's
crappy late-night music. There's also a stranger named Claire
(Charlene Kaleina), who's forced into giving Anthony a ride when he
suddenly jumps into her car -- and later begins to stalk him. If
you couldn't already guess, none of this makes much logical sense,
and it's difficult to know what's real, or what's in the vivid
imagination of this drunk sociopath. FYI, the title seems to refer
to Coltrane's long-overdue observation that public transit is the
killer's getaway method. Johanna Heer's photography is expressive
but overly-dark, with extreme lighting design and seedy NYC locales
aplenty, while the soundtrack includes Robert Fripp, Ivan Kral and
The Lounge Lizards (with Lurie showing up briefly, in dramatized
portions from Anthony's script, playing jazz sax).
ships in a plain sleeve with no artwork.