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IF YOU OWN ONE, IT?S

A WESTERN TREASURE


On all multiple items after the first, you will receive a 10% discount.

Postage will be combined and refund granted if saved

.

Folks, as many of you know, I search old museums, bookstores, cellars and attics for seldom read and rarely found stories of the old west. Here is ?Hawkins?the Big 50,? by Ernest Lisle Reedstrom who says the modern term, Plains Rifle, has been coined by collectors to designate the short heavy rifle favored by the fur trader and the frontiersman of the American west in the years 1820 to 1860. Contemporaries called them mountain rifles or Hawken Rifles for the Hawken brothers who were the makers. Here is a history of those brothers including pictures of Jim Baker with his Hawkens, pictures of Hawkens as in Smithsonian, and Hawkens as in the Nebraska State Historical Society. This includes a Hawken advertisement appearing in the 1847 St. Louis Business Directory, a picture of Samuel T. Hawken himself, and Reedstrom painting ?Custer's Last Campaign.? Author gives exact caliber and specifications of old Hawkens including the one made especially for General William H. Ashley that was 66 to 68 caliber and 3 feet 6 inches long. The General killed a bear using this gun with one shot at a distance of 280 in 1824. It is believed to be a record distance for a Hawken. All the famous westerners of the time carried Hawkens, including Scouts Kit Carson and Jim Bridger. The Hawkens was such a popular and famous rifle that contests were held to see how fast the winner could load and fire. The most talented could fire and load their Hawkens Rifle five times in a minute. Details of size, shape, barrel lengths, caliber, powder charges, and descriptions!!!

A very detailed history of the Hawkens Rifle

Now, the most treasured of all rifles of the west was the ?Hawken Plain? or Mountain Rifle and if any object can claim the honor of opening the west, it was this new-fangled caplock rifle which sold for $25.00. The stories of the accomplishment are legendary. Here?s one:

Seems that General William H. Ashley chose to carry a Hawkens Rifle and ordered one that was 66 to 68 caliber and 3 feet 6 inches long. The General killed a bear using this gun with one shot at a distance of 280 yards in 1824. It is believed to be a record distance for a Hawken. All the famous westerners of the time carried Hawkens, including Scouts Kit Carson and Jim Bridger. The Hawkens was such a popular and famous rifle that contests were held to see how fast the winner could load and fire. The most talented could fire and load their Hawkens Rifle five times in a minute. Details of size, shape, barrel lengths, caliber, powder charges, and descriptions!!!

The Hawkens Rifle was one of a kind!

Please read this. There were many western stories published ? the common ones about Cowboys and Indians are listed on Ebay every day but the little known ones like this rare and hard to find one of a kind collector?s item about specifications and stories of the Hawkens Rifle. This is a particularly hard to come by issue. It is a collector?s item sparsely published by Major Magazines, Inc. and includes one of the better, untold and rarer stories published.

It?s one of the best.

FOLLOWING PURCHASE AND PAYMENT, IF YOU WILL WRITE ME OF YOUR SPECIAL NAME OR INTEREST, I WILL DO A FREE SEARCH OF MY COLLECTIN AND UNINDEXED STORIES AND NAMES. TOM RUSSELL COLLECTION

For more Information Please Visit:

The Tom Russell Collection

IF I FIND SOMETHING THAT I THINK MERITS YOUR INTEREST, I WILL WRITE A REVIEW AND PLACE IT ON EBAY AND GIVE YOU NOTICE AND A HEAD START TO BUYITNOW!

Following my retirement, I have dedicated my remaining hours to indexing the Genealogy of our western pioneers. During my research, I discovered that thousands of our kinfolk lay unfound and unrecognized on some book dealer?s shelf gathering dust. Because Old Western History and Memorabilia was printed before computer indexing, I index every item I sell.

This complete index will be bound and included in this offering at no additional cost.

Humbly, I am trying to keep history alive.

I hope you appreciate the effort.


HAWKENS?THE BIG 50

Folks, sooner or later - Genealogists are going to realize that their family kinfolks are laying on some dealer's dusty shelves. If I can contribute to finding one little name or photo of that long lost ancestor you have been waiting to find, it?s worth all the time I spend.

By Ernest Lisle Reedstrom

ANCESTORS INDEXED HEREIN, CIRCA 1820?s ? 1870?s

ANCESTOR?S LOCATION: UNITED STATES

GENEALOGY NAMES INDEXED w * INDICATING PICTURE:

ASHLEY, William H., General

ASHMORE, R., name stamped on locks made for Hawkens

BAKER, Jim *

BRIDGER, Jim, Scout,

CARSON, Kit, Scout

DIMICK, H., of St. Louis, Missouri

GOLCHER, Joseph

GOVE, Carlos

HAWKEN, Jacob, of St. Louis, Missouri

HAWKEN, Jake

HAWKEN, Samuel T., of St. Louis, Missouri *

KRIDER, John

LEMAN, Henry, of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

LOVE, C. Waldo, Artist

LOWER, J. P.

MALTBY, Jasper, of Galena, Illinois

MEEK, Joe

MEYER, name stamped on locks made for Hawkens

MODENA, Mariano

MONROE, President

REEDSTROM, Ernest Lisle, Author and Artist

ROOD, Morgan, of Denver, Colorado

TRYON, E. K., of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

WILLIAMS, Bill

PICTURES AND DESCRIPTIONS w * INDICATING PICTURE:

Picture 1: Plains rifle by Samuel Hawken. This gun has been carefully repaired in the waist. *

Picture 2: The mountain men journeyed to the Hawken shop to order their rifles. (Drawing by D. L. Reedstrom) *

Picture 3: The easiest way to carry a rifle on horseback was across the saddle bow often balanced only on the keens. A flat piece of leather was sometimes used to secure the gun. There were two slots in the strip, one slot dropped over the saddle horn and other looped up and pulled over the horn. (Drawing by E. L. Reedstrom) *

Picture 4: Jim Baker, famed mountain man and trapper with his Hawken rifle. (Painting by C. Waldo Love) *

Picture 5: (1) Typical Leman Rifle; (2) Leman Trade Rifle, with brass tacks and rawhide repairs, typical of Indian use; (3) Rifle by J. Henry & Son, with ?U.S.? on stock. *

Picture 6: 50 caliber Hawken ?Mountain Rifle.? *

Picture 7: Hawken advertisement appearing in the 1847 St. Louis directory. *

Picture 8: Samuel T. Hawken, famed gunsmith of St. Louis. *

Picture 9: Amongst the many weapons such as the Winchester, Henry, Lancaster, and Spencer, the Hawken also found its way to Little Big Horn. (Painting, ?Custer?s Last Campaign,? by Ernest L. Reedstrom) *

PLACES AND THINGS PROMINENTLY MENTIONED w * INDICATING PICTURE:

Arkansas

Black Fork

Bridger's Fort

?Custer?s Last Campaign? *, by Ernest L. Reedstrom

English Sporting Rifles

Fremont Expedition

Great Salt Lake

Great Western Plains

Green River, Wyoming

Harper's Ferry

Hawken Mountain Rifle, 50 caliber *

Hawken Rifle *

Henry Rifle

Indian Rifles

J. & S. Hawken

J. & S. Hawken Advertisement *

J. Henry & Son Rifle *

Kentucky Rifle

Lancaster Rifle

Leman Rifle *

Leman Trade Rifle *

Missouri Rifles

Missouri River

New-Fangled Caplock Rifle

Ohio Valley

Pennsylvania

Plains Rifle *

Plainsman Rifles

Rocky Mountains

Spencer Rifle

St. Louis

St. Louis Guns

Winchester Rifle

Wyoming

Yellowstone

HAWKENS - THE BIG 50 RIFLE

J & S HAWKENS - RIFLEMAKERS OF THE WEST

HAWKEN RIFLE MEMORABILIA IS RAPIDLY DISAPPEARING

While others clip ads from magazines, I save history. It?s a shame that our past is being lost. It?s as simple as that.